Home Herbs Recipes Dedication About Us
Welcome to the kitchen of Pain Acadien!
Bread making is a wonderful art-- it’s so delicious it must be shared!

Since being taught the basics of bread making from my mother as a child, I’ve continued collecting old and new recipes over the years. Most of my bread recipes have come from older generations, and have such wonderful stories behind them. My Martin White recipe came from a mother of 19 children and made 10-12 loaves at a time. Interestingly enough, instead of using measuring cups and spoons, all of the recipe’s measurements were made using a specific family-owned spoon. Measurements were either “1 flat spoon of salt” or “1 rounded spoon of sugar.” As for my mom’s bread, two of our childhood summer camps were built by friends and family with only the promise of my mother’s homemade bread and baked beans as payment.
Every day that I bake, I spend the morning prepping some key ingredients for my homemade breads: a cornmeal mush is mixed for my Anadama recipe; an oatmeal porridge is cooked, then cooled for my Dark Oatmeal loaves; sunflower and sesame seeds are toasted, then added to cooked oats, wheat, corn, and flax seeds for my Multi-grain loaves; rye berries are ground into flour for my Swedish Rye bread; and finally wheat berries are ground, then added to melted butter and warm milk for my Wheat bread.

After the beginning prep is finished, additional wholesome ingredients are mixed in my industrial mixer. The dough is set aside to rise and then formed into 2 pound loaves, 1.5 pound boules, and/or a dozen rolls. After cooking and cooling, the bread is delivered to local farm stands where it is sold to you!
Our Bread Flavors:
To buy a loaf or two, head over to Stevenson’s Farm Stand in Winthrop or Levesque's Farm Stand in Leeds, throughout the summer and fall. My bread is also available year-round at The Flaky Tart Cafe  in Winthrop, as well as the Weston’s Meat Market in West Gardiner.

Remember, to assure your breads have a good shelf life, you must be careful not to refrigerate bread.  This changes the molecular composition of bread, making it stale quicker.  If the need arises to preserve bread, it is advised to slice what you need and freeze the remainder. To thaw, just leave it on the counter for a couple of hours, and then enjoy!

Thank you for visiting us here, and I hope to make many breads for you and your family and friends to enjoy!
Pain Acadien
420 Campground Road, Livermore Falls, Maine 04254
Email: info@painacadien.com   Phone: 207-897-3674